Mrs. Jones & Co.

People, places, and things (and happenings!) In my life that interest me!
diyhomesteading:

policymic:

‘Liking’ a brand’s Facebook page may now bar you from suing them

By now, we’ve all learned to be a little more cautious when it comes to “liking” Facebook pages. One click in support of a band or a TV show, and suddenly your News Feed is bombarded with spam and unwanted updates. But did you know with a simple Facebook “like,” you could be signing away several of your legal rights as well?
That’s the case with General Mills, anyways. The food giant — which owns numerous brands including Cheerios, Lucky Charms, Trix, Betty Crocker, Pillsbury and Häagen-Dazs — updated its legal terms on Tuesday. While that would normally be snooze-worthy news, the new conditions are enough to make your jaw drop: Now every time you download a coupon, enter a General Mills sweepstakes or even “like” one of its brands on Facebook, you waive your right to sue the company.
Read more | Follow policymic


Free speech is eroding yet again or this would be a brilliant test case.

diyhomesteading:

policymic:

‘Liking’ a brand’s Facebook page may now bar you from suing them

By now, we’ve all learned to be a little more cautious when it comes to “liking” Facebook pages. One click in support of a band or a TV show, and suddenly your News Feed is bombarded with spam and unwanted updates. But did you know with a simple Facebook “like,” you could be signing away several of your legal rights as well?

That’s the case with General Mills, anyways. The food giant — which owns numerous brands including Cheerios, Lucky Charms, Trix, Betty Crocker, Pillsbury and Häagen-Dazs — updated its legal terms on Tuesday. While that would normally be snooze-worthy news, the new conditions are enough to make your jaw drop: Now every time you download a coupon, enter a General Mills sweepstakes or even “like” one of its brands on Facebook, you waive your right to sue the company.

Read moreFollow policymic

Free speech is eroding yet again or this would be a brilliant test case.

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

—Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery.  (via numbskullmischief)

(via diyhomesteading)

herecomesthesun-king asked: In fact, why don't you focus on the positive results of cultural appropriation?? They greatly outweigh the negatives. And you can't escape appropriation, you do it every day, likely unknowingly. In all due respect, get your head out of your ass and actually do something to make the world a better place: buy fair trade, fund third world countries, go vegan or vegetarian, boycott large corps that exploit and abuse third world workers. Your existence does plenty to hurt others.

bornabitch-allthedaysandnights:

terarroni:

bornabitch-allthedaysandnights:

There are no positive results of cultural appropriation. It is harmful. PERIOD. 

More importantly you do not understand this because there is a huge difference between examples of cultural diffusion and cultural appropriation. I do not cherry pick and misuse elements of other cultures. When I do participate in other culture’s traditions, it’s because THEY INVITED ME, not because I felt entitled to their traditions.

Your are being EXTREMELY RUDE AND HATEFUL, ishavemyheadandsometimesmypussy. YOU are the one that needs to get your head out of your ass because you’re talking about something that you literally know NOTHING about. 

And your suggestions are similarly ignorant. Fair trade is FULL of corruption and problems, most of the money never goes to the farmers and in fact can be extremely harmful to local economies. Going vegetarian or vegan does nothing to help the HUMAN BEINGS that pick your vegetables, and prioritizes animals over the people of color that live in unbearable and illegal conditions. This doesn’t even include the imperialistic erasure of traditional foods or the traditions of indigenous people that include hunting. Why don’t you do something and care about the people that are living in ‘third world conditions’ in YOUR country because you want cheap vegetables so you can lord your imperialistic vegetarianism over people like an arrogant asshole.

So why don’t you get off your ass with your pathetic liberal agenda and actually do things to improve the lives of the people around you, the people that pick the vegetables you eat, the people that clean your schools and local businesses instead of concentrating on bullshit consumerism-as-activism which has been shown to be ineffective. 

In which bornabitch-allthedaysandnights slays the complete and total ignorance that is ish4vemyheadandsometimesmypussy's existence.

Related:

Where is the money going?" by Dr. Peter Griffiths, Marketing Economist

Fair Trade Will Lead to More Misery for Africa" by John Meadowcraft

The Economics of Fair Trade: A Christian Perspective" by Philip Booth, Editorial and Programme Director at the Institute of Economic Affairs and Professor of Insurance and Risk Management at Cass Business School

The Problem with Fair Trade Coffee" by Colleen Haight, assistant professor at San Jose State University, currently on leave to serve as the economics program officer at the Institute for Humane Studies at George Mason University

Not so fair trade" by Andrew Chambers, The Guardian

Argument Against Cultural Appropriation + Small History Lesson by Tumblr User girljanitor

Collection of Posts on Cultural Appropriation by Trudy (gradientlair), professional, college-educated Writer/Social Critic

Notes on bell hooks, cultural appropriation, and imperialism" by RedClimbingLily

"Cultural Appropriation" excerpt from ‘A Companion to the Anthropology of American Indians’ by Tressa Berman

Ten Definitions of Cultural Appropriation hosted on ‘A Friendly Letter’

"Cultural Appropriation" works hosted on Academia.edu for free download

"The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation" James O. Young, Conrad G. Brunk on Google Books

"Borrowed Power: Essays on Cultural Appropriation" by Bruce H. Ziff, Pratima V. Rao

"Cultural Appropriation and the Arts" by James O. Young (Chapter 1 goes over what Cultural Appropriation is)

"Law, Culture, and Cultural Appropriation" by Sally Engle Merry in the Yale Journal of Law & The Humanities

"Intellectual Property and Cultural Appropriation" by Josh Berson (you’ll need an account or to buy the article)

"Ownership and Appropriation" by Veronica Strang, Mark Busse (you’ll have to buy the article to read the whole thing, but the excerpt gives a small introduction)

"Appropriation in Contemporary Art" by Hayley A. Rower for the Student Pulse International Student Journal 

"The Line between Appropriation and Appreciation" by tumblr user VanillaxCoke

"Harmful Mindsets and Behaviors by Appropriators" by tumblr user Ectinix

“This isn’t a matter of telling people what to wear. It’s a matter of telling people that they don’t wear things in a vacuum and there are many social and historical implications to treating marginalized cultures like costumes. […] Cultural appropriation is itself a real issue because it demonstrates the imbalance of power that still remains between cultures that have been colonized and the ex-colonizers.” From "The Difference Between Cultural Exchange and Cultural Appropriation" on EverdayFeminism

followed up by terarroni rocking it with her amazingly well organized resources! Thank you bunches.

How Phoenix Convicted A Transgender Woman For Walking Down The Street

transitiontransmission:

A transgender woman of color named Monica Jones was convicted last week for walking down the street. The charge? “Manifestation of prostitution.” But Jones isn’t a sex worker. She just happens to live in Phoenix, Arizona, where a new tactic to reduce sex work provides new opportunities for police to profile vulnerable populations.

While Jones’ conviction is fully legal in Phoenix, it’s become a rallying cry for trans rights issues, since it so clearly illustrated biases ingrained in the law. Here’s a break down of all the elements that led to Jones’ arrest:

“Manifestation Of Prostitution”

One of the first problems is the incredibly vague way that Phoenix’s law against prostitutionactually defines what constitutes an arrest-worthy offense. In addition to literally offering or soliciting prostitution, the law also enumerates a number of actions that can constitute an “intent” to break the law:

Is in a public place, a place open to public view or in a motor vehicle on a public roadway and manifests an intent to commit or solicit an act of prostitution. Among the circumstances that may be considered in determining whether such an intent is manifested are: that the person repeatedly beckons to, stops or attempts to stop or engage passersby in conversation or repeatedly, stops or attempts to stop, motor vehicle operators by hailing, waiving of arms or any other bodily gesture; that the person inquires whether a potential patron, procurer or prostitute is a police officer or searches for articles that would identify a police officer; or that the person requests the touching or exposure of genitals or female breast.

According to the law, it doesn’t matter if prostitution solicitation actually takes place; simply conveying one of these other actions constitutes a violation of the law. For example, a group of cheerleaders holding a carwash could be arrested under this law for trying to advertise their fundraiser by waving at passing cars.

Additionally, the law dictates that a first offense results in a mandatory minimum of 15 days in jail, up to a maximum of six months, as well as the possibility of a fine up to $2,500. The mandatory minimums increase significantly with each prior charge a person carries. These vague “manifestations” of prostitution thus create opportunity to entrap and punish individuals with prostitution charges even if they are not actually engaging in sex work.

Monica Jones’ Arrest and Conviction

Monica Jones is a student at ASU’s School of Social Work, a sex worker rights advocate with SWOP, and a trans woman of color. When Phoenix police were conducting a Project ROSE sweep in May of 2013, Jones spoke at a community event against the program. The following evening, she was offered a ride home from a bar, only to be not-arrested by the undercover cop, who placed her in handcuffs and drove her to Bethany Bible Church. Jones, however, was not eligible for Project ROSE because of a prior prostitution conviction, despite no longer being a sex worker. Jones was charged with “manifestation of prostitution” and last week, she was convicted and sentenced to 30 days in a men’s prison.

The prosecution’s only witness was the arresting officer, who repeatedly referred to Jones with the male pronouns “he” and “him.” He alleged that she “exposed her breast,” though advocates for Jones suggest her only crime was asking if he was a police officer (knowing full well that Project ROSE sweeps were underway that weekend). The judge deliberated for less than one minute before handing down a guilty verdict. According to the ACLU, which helped represent Jones, the judge’s assumption that the officer’s testimony was credible while hers was hearsay is “erroneous and improper.”

During the time between her arrest and her trial, Jones says she was stopped by police on four more occasions while walking around her neighborhood and threatened with additional “manifestation of prostitution” charges. She explained to the ACLU how “walking while trans” has become a crime in and of itself:

JONES: “Walking while trans” is a saying we use in the trans community to refer to the excessive harassment and targeting that we as trans people experience on a daily basis. “Walking while trans” is a way to talk about the overlapping biases against trans people — trans women specifically — and against sex workers. It’s a known experience in our community of being routinely and regularly harassed and facing the threat of violence or arrest because we are trans and therefore often assumed to be sex workers.

I have been harassed by police four times since my initial arrest last May. The police have stopped me for no real reason when I have been walking to the grocery store, to the local bar, or visiting with a friend on the sidewalk. The police have even threatened me with ‘manifestation with intent to prostitute’ charge, while I was just walking to my local bar!

Police harassment of transgender people is not unusual even absent sex work profiling. According to the National Transgender Discrimination Survey, 29 percent of trans people have experienced police harassment or disrespect. Rates were much higher for people of color. Additionally, 46 percent of trans people report they are generally uncomfortable even seeking police assistance.

Jones has already filed an appeal and is continuing her fight.

(via diyhomesteading)

  1. Go to a party and stay sober. Listen to the way your drunk classmates talk when they don’t plan to remember tonight when they wake up. Never talk about these experiences, just keep them for yourself.
  2. Start driving in one direction on the highway after school one day, pretending like you’re running away. Blast bad pop music and sing along. Stop in the suburbs when your mom calls you to come home, but buy your little brother a cupcake before you turn back around.
  3. Kiss your best friend. It doesn’t matter what sexuality or gender you are or they are. It doesn’t matter if it’s a peck or you escalate to tongue. You’ll laugh about it later, but it will always make you smile just for the memory.
  4. Smoke a cigarette. Let it burn your throat. Cough, loudly.
  5. Take a stand for something you believe in. When half your school laughs at you, take it with pride. Someone agrees, even if they’re too scared to say so.
  6. Make enemies. Make the kind of mistakes that cause your life to implode. Lose everyone and everything to these mistakes. Only when you fall will you find out that you can pick yourself back up.
  7. Sit on someone’s roof and talk for hours. Forget about dinner and tell your origin stories. Let your guard down while the dog barks below. Talk about god. Listen.
  8. Steal Bourbon from your parents’ liquor cabinet and put it in a water bottle beneath your bathroom sink. Spike your tea with it when you think you’ve hit rock bottom. Pour the whole thing down the drain when it’s too strong for you.
  9. Become a stereotype. Buy a record player and combat boots. Wear all black. Dye your hair bright blue and get your ear pierced three times. Don’t care when people laugh at you.
  10. Make wishes at 11:11. Wear your pajamas backwards in the hopes of a snow day. Look for answers at the bottom of a bottle. Pretend writing things on your arms makes you special. Believe in anything. Believe in everything. Open every book and look around every corner. You’ll never look like this or move like this or think like this again. Enjoy it while it lasts or hate every second. But feel. Feel every damn thing.

—Top Ten Things to do Before You Graduate High School by M.S. (via sestinalia)

(via diyhomesteading)

Fluff rice with a fork, never stir it with a spoon.
Vaseline is the best night time eye cream on the market.
You can buy alcohol and chips with your parents’ gas station credit cards.
If you force something, you’ll break it. That could be good or bad.
It’s important to read the care tags on your clothing and follow those instructions.
Related: don’t wash and dry j. crew wool sweaters.
Changing your car’s oil is not optional.
Whatever physical objects you acquire you will one day have to put into a box and move.
You’re allowed to disagree with negative feedback.
It’s always worth reading the instruction manual.
Nostalgia, like any drug, can be a poison or a remedy.
Pets are like human friends but better in every conceivable way.
Good doctors listen more than they talk.
You can’t fix a burned roux.
Floss.
Just because someone is an authority figure does not mean they are intelligent/competent/right.
Measure twice, cut once.
Get your nice jeans and dress pants tailored by a professional.
If you’re uncomfortable wearing it you will not look good.
You’re not required to drink alcohol while in a bar.
There are a few things that cure all ills: the beach, your favorite album on vinyl, and fresh garlic.
Kindness is not weakness.
Baking soda is not baking powder.
Taking Excedrin P.M. while still in public is not advisable.
Terrible people will succeed. Wonderful people will fail. The world is not fair.
Appropriate footwear is always key.
You can absolutely be too forgiving.
Real humor punches up, not down.
Reading the assigned chapters will actually help you learn the material.
There are no adults. Everyone is as clueless as you are.
Applying eyeliner well is a timeless art.
You can always leave. Awkward dates, suffocating jobs, hometowns that you outgrow, relationships that aren’t growing in the right direction.
You can always come home again.
But it won’t be the same.
Life is too short for bad books, boring movies, shitty people, and margarine.
Never underestimate the importance of eyebrows.

zitadevi:

Hey WITCHes!
Yesterday I finally bit the bullet and made some cloth napkins just in time for my guests to arrive. I had already done two the night before, so the rest of them got churned out in no time, or rather like less than two hours (including a FUCKING BOBBIN CHANGE UUHG!) 
 
Anyway, if you are interested in cutting back on your paper-spending, and you want to give up paper towels, this is actually pretty important. I never bought paper napkins before, and I thought I was saving money already there, but the trust is that I was using paper towels as napkins anyway, and just not admitting to myself that it was happening. 
So once we moved and I refused to buy paper towels, the truth was unavoidable, I need napkins, and so does Niko and if someone comes over, they are going to need one. 
 
SO! I looked through some tutorials online and obviously it’s a pretty simple project, but if you wan them to look at all professional, you really need to do this specific stitch. 
The best tutorial I found was over at Homestead Revival
As much as I don’t want to support an openly Christian blogger, it’s somewhat unavoidable since they dominate the home-making scene in the English speaking internets. 
 
So I didn’t use the measurements and OMG don’t read the comments section unless you want to be reminded that grown adults who use fractions every day, don’t know how to perform simple arithmetic involving fractions. But I DID use the paper triangle thing, and the general, iron and pin everything and sew once, plan of action. 
 
I divided 1 yard into 9 pieces to maximize the fabric. Most people get 6 or even as few as 4 out of a yard, but I think that’s really wasteful considering you don’t need a fucking blanket across your lap, and who fucking cares if it’s a square or not. I mean, seriously.

zitadevi:

Hey WITCHes!

Yesterday I finally bit the bullet and made some cloth napkins just in time for my guests to arrive. I had already done two the night before, so the rest of them got churned out in no time, or rather like less than two hours (including a FUCKING BOBBIN CHANGE UUHG!)

 

Anyway, if you are interested in cutting back on your paper-spending, and you want to give up paper towels, this is actually pretty important. I never bought paper napkins before, and I thought I was saving money already there, but the trust is that I was using paper towels as napkins anyway, and just not admitting to myself that it was happening.

So once we moved and I refused to buy paper towels, the truth was unavoidable, I need napkins, and so does Niko and if someone comes over, they are going to need one.

 

SO! I looked through some tutorials online and obviously it’s a pretty simple project, but if you wan them to look at all professional, you really need to do this specific stitch.

The best tutorial I found was over at Homestead Revival

As much as I don’t want to support an openly Christian blogger, it’s somewhat unavoidable since they dominate the home-making scene in the English speaking internets.

 

So I didn’t use the measurements and OMG don’t read the comments section unless you want to be reminded that grown adults who use fractions every day, don’t know how to perform simple arithmetic involving fractions. But I DID use the paper triangle thing, and the general, iron and pin everything and sew once, plan of action.

 

I divided 1 yard into 9 pieces to maximize the fabric. Most people get 6 or even as few as 4 out of a yard, but I think that’s really wasteful considering you don’t need a fucking blanket across your lap, and who fucking cares if it’s a square or not. I mean, seriously.

brittneyreads:

Currently Reading
The Gentle Art of Domesticity by Jane Brocket (64/274 pp.)
This is such a gorgeous book; it makes me want to do nothing but bake and crochet all the time.

brittneyreads:

Currently Reading

The Gentle Art of Domesticity by Jane Brocket (64/274 pp.)

This is such a gorgeous book; it makes me want to do nothing but bake and crochet all the time.